Report links obesity to advanced prostate cancer

10:35am Wednesday 19th November 2014

content supplied by NHS Choices

"Being overweight raises risk of men developing aggressive prostate cancer," The Guardian reports.

A major new report from the World Cancer Research Fund has found strong evidence obesity increases the risk of aggressive prostate cancer.

This report, which considered the results from 104 studies involving more than nine million men, looked at diet, nutrition, physical activity, weight and the risk of prostate cancer.

It also found strong evidence that being tall - a marker of developmental factors in the womb, childhood and adolescence - increases the risk of prostate cancer.

The report found limited evidence for a link between diets high in dairy products or calcium and an increased risk of prostate cancer, and low blood levels of vitamin E or selenium and an increased risk of developing cancer. 

The report recommends maintaining a healthy weighteating a healthy diet and being physically active to reduce your risk of cancer. These recommendations seem both sensible and well founded.

 

How could obesity lead to prostate cancer?

The report offers two, as yet unproven, hypotheses:

Who produced the report?

The report was produced by the World Cancer Research Fund International as part of their Continuous Update Project.

This report aims to update a report from 2007 by analysing global prostate cancer prevention and survival research linked to diet, nutrition, physical activity and weight.

The results were well reported by the media.

 

What evidence did the report look at?

The report is based on the findings of a systematic review performed by a team at Imperial College London, and its interpretation by a panel of independent experts.

The systematic review included randomised controlled trials, and cohort and case-control studies identified from the Medline database.

The results from 104 studies were analysed. This included more than nine million men, 191,000 of whom had prostate cancer.

 

What are the main findings of the report?

The report found strong evidence that:

There was limited evidence that:

The report made no conclusions about whether a number of other factors increased or decreased the risk of prostate cancer. For example:

This is not an exhaustive list. For the complete list, you can download the report for free (PDF, 2.49Mb).

No conclusions were made because the studies identified were either poor quality, their results were inconsistent, or too few studies were identified.

Analysis by Bazian. Edited by NHS Choices. Follow Behind the Headlines on Twitter. Join the Healthy Evidence forum.

Summary

"Being overweight raises risk of men developing aggressive prostate cancer," The Guardian reports. A major new report from the World Cancer Research Fund has found strong evidence obesity increases the risk of aggressive prostate cancer.

Links to Headlines

Being overweight raises risk of men developing aggressive prostate cancer. The Guardian, November 19 2014

Obesity 'raises prostate cancer risk': 10% of cases could be prevented if men kept themselves at a healthy weight. Daily Mail, November 19 2014

Links to Science

World Cancer Research Fund International. Diet, nutrition, physical activity and prostate cancer (PDF 2.49Mb). November 2014

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