Pool's plea to Herefordshire teens: Don't stop the music

Pool's plea to teens: Don't stop the music

Do you want to follow in the steps of Ellie Goulding?

Cliff Woollard (head of Music Service), Ian Archer (Courtyard, chief executive), Richard Loveridge (Courtyard, sound engineer) and Rob Strawson (Music Pool) from the county's music hub are waiting to welcome Herefordshire’s young musicians. Phot

Is there a future Ellie Goulding out there?

First published in News
Last updated

A COMPETITION that would give one county act the opportunity to follow in the footsteps of Ellie Goulding has failed to hit the right note.

Back in November 2013, local charity The Music Pool and the Herefordshire Music Service launched OMG Herefordshire – a search to try and find an aspiring young local band or singer to perform at Birmingham’s LG Arena as part of an event called OMG Live.

But only one act has applied and organisers say they are concerned both for the competition itself, and more widely for the future of emerging music in the county.

Joe Schiavon, project manager, said: “When I was in bands, this is the opportunity that I would have jumped at – it’s not like there’s lots to do to enter.

“We are at a bit of a loss as to why it hasn’t happened. It’s disappointing and it’s a bit of a worry for the future of music in Hereford if there’s not a good supply of bands coming through.”

Organisers say the timing of the competition could be one explanation for the poor response – with young people having mock exams to worry about and spending time with family over Christmas.

The initial deadline was extended to allow further applications over Christmas, but has now been extended again.

"Generating interest in what is a fantastic opportunity and great experience for any young artist should surely not be this difficult? If anything, performers should be banging the door down to get a piece of the action, but that doesn’t seem to be the case.

"So what we’re wondering now is - where are all the young bands and musicians in Herefordshire?” Joe added.

To enter, all performers must do is record a video of themselves performing a song – an original or cover – upload it to YouTube and submit the link via The Music Pool website.

Online submissions now close on Thursday January 23 at 5pm, and all performers must be 19 or under on the date of OMG Live – 24th April 2014 – to be eligible.

Go to musicpool.org.uk/omgherefordshire to enter or for more information.

Comments (12)

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2:14pm Thu 9 Jan 14

Ivor P says...

Check out Hereford live -we're doing something about ithttps://www.facebo
ok.com/events/167864
920091518/?source=1
Check out Hereford live -we're doing something about ithttps://www.facebo ok.com/events/167864 920091518/?source=1 Ivor P
  • Score: 0

2:15pm Thu 9 Jan 14

Ivor P says...

Check out Hereford Live-we are doing our best & come to our showcase night this Saturday @ the Jailhousehttps://www
.facebook.com/events
/167864920091518/?so
urce=1
Check out Hereford Live-we are doing our best & come to our showcase night this Saturday @ the Jailhousehttps://www .facebook.com/events /167864920091518/?so urce=1 Ivor P
  • Score: 0

3:47pm Thu 9 Jan 14

Rollo13 says...

i appreciate that music is very important to society and culture but it is not the be all and end all to life as we know it. please encourage the kids to get off their backsides and computer screens and produce something that isn't football or 'beyonce' based rubbbish! Dreams are good but not a basis for life!
i appreciate that music is very important to society and culture but it is not the be all and end all to life as we know it. please encourage the kids to get off their backsides and computer screens and produce something that isn't football or 'beyonce' based rubbbish! Dreams are good but not a basis for life! Rollo13
  • Score: 0

7:35pm Thu 9 Jan 14

mrscountryrose says...

Not all youngsters are into 'beyonce' based rubbish. The problem young bands have in Hereford is that due to licensing laws they are not allowed to play as they are under 18. This means that a band based in Hereford can not play in Hereford. We need a change in the law to allow these talented young bands to play in events such as the ones that are organised by Hereford Live who are doing a fantastic job.What are dreams If dreams are not a basis for life , music inspires.
Not all youngsters are into 'beyonce' based rubbish. The problem young bands have in Hereford is that due to licensing laws they are not allowed to play as they are under 18. This means that a band based in Hereford can not play in Hereford. We need a change in the law to allow these talented young bands to play in events such as the ones that are organised by Hereford Live who are doing a fantastic job.What are dreams If dreams are not a basis for life , music inspires. mrscountryrose
  • Score: 6

1:38am Fri 10 Jan 14

petet25 says...

The people running this seem completely clueless.

Years ago where to get anywhere with music you needed to win a competition or have deep pockets to pay for lots of studio time and a promoter.

Now with technology, people tend to do it all themselves. They can use music software and minimal hardware to do the job an engineer would of once done for a hefty fee, and instead of paying a promoter to find bookings/labels they can turn to social networking and places like soundcloud to upload their work at no cost.

Let's face it, the people who could potentially enter this will either be good or bad bands. If they are bad, they know there is no chance of winning and that they will have to keep practising before entering something like this. If they are good, they will probably already be at the level they expect to get to.
The people running this seem completely clueless. Years ago where to get anywhere with music you needed to win a competition or have deep pockets to pay for lots of studio time and a promoter. Now with technology, people tend to do it all themselves. They can use music software and minimal hardware to do the job an engineer would of once done for a hefty fee, and instead of paying a promoter to find bookings/labels they can turn to social networking and places like soundcloud to upload their work at no cost. Let's face it, the people who could potentially enter this will either be good or bad bands. If they are bad, they know there is no chance of winning and that they will have to keep practising before entering something like this. If they are good, they will probably already be at the level they expect to get to. petet25
  • Score: -1

8:07am Fri 10 Jan 14

drjazz says...

Rollo13 wrote:
i appreciate that music is very important to society and culture but it is not the be all and end all to life as we know it. please encourage the kids to get off their backsides and computer screens and produce something that isn't football or 'beyonce' based rubbbish! Dreams are good but not a basis for life!
May I politely request you get off your backside and computer screen after such a crass comment.
Perhaps it would do you good to dare to dream once in a while.
[quote][p][bold]Rollo13[/bold] wrote: i appreciate that music is very important to society and culture but it is not the be all and end all to life as we know it. please encourage the kids to get off their backsides and computer screens and produce something that isn't football or 'beyonce' based rubbbish! Dreams are good but not a basis for life![/p][/quote]May I politely request you get off your backside and computer screen after such a crass comment. Perhaps it would do you good to dare to dream once in a while. drjazz
  • Score: 2

9:54am Fri 10 Jan 14

mizza21 says...

OMG WTF LMAO etc etc

There's plenty of good young bands in Herefordshire. They just ain't interested in this event.

Rollo13 . To quote HMHB... If music be the food of love are you the indigestion?
OMG WTF LMAO etc etc There's plenty of good young bands in Herefordshire. They just ain't interested in this event. Rollo13 . To quote HMHB... If music be the food of love are you the indigestion? mizza21
  • Score: 2

12:25pm Fri 10 Jan 14

ArmadilloSackRace says...

petet25 wrote:
The people running this seem completely clueless.

Years ago where to get anywhere with music you needed to win a competition or have deep pockets to pay for lots of studio time and a promoter.

Now with technology, people tend to do it all themselves. They can use music software and minimal hardware to do the job an engineer would of once done for a hefty fee, and instead of paying a promoter to find bookings/labels they can turn to social networking and places like soundcloud to upload their work at no cost.

Let's face it, the people who could potentially enter this will either be good or bad bands. If they are bad, they know there is no chance of winning and that they will have to keep practising before entering something like this. If they are good, they will probably already be at the level they expect to get to.
Sorry, I don't really get your point. How does any of what you say make the "people running this seem completely clueless"?
[quote][p][bold]petet25[/bold] wrote: The people running this seem completely clueless. Years ago where to get anywhere with music you needed to win a competition or have deep pockets to pay for lots of studio time and a promoter. Now with technology, people tend to do it all themselves. They can use music software and minimal hardware to do the job an engineer would of once done for a hefty fee, and instead of paying a promoter to find bookings/labels they can turn to social networking and places like soundcloud to upload their work at no cost. Let's face it, the people who could potentially enter this will either be good or bad bands. If they are bad, they know there is no chance of winning and that they will have to keep practising before entering something like this. If they are good, they will probably already be at the level they expect to get to.[/p][/quote]Sorry, I don't really get your point. How does any of what you say make the "people running this seem completely clueless"? ArmadilloSackRace
  • Score: 2

12:54pm Fri 10 Jan 14

petet25 says...

"I don't really get your point. How does any of what you say make the "people running this seem completely clueless"?"

Because they don't seem to understand the industry today. As they say "performers should be banging the door down to get a piece of the action" and they expect young people to jump at the chance. When in actual fact it may of been the case 10 years ago but with the advances in technology, young people who are good enough are already able to be noticed.

Young people good enough to enter this would of once used competitions and things like this to potentially get signed to a label. Before the digital age it would of been costly to have music mass produced and pressed to tape, cd or vinyl. Now though people who are good enough can just release things as a digital download which costs now money.

Underground music becoming more commercial also plays a part. Years ago it would of been 90% bands and live performers. Now though a lot of young people are getting into dubstep and drum and bass, which is synthesised music. So instead of being able to perform it, it's made in bedroom studios through sequencing software.
"I don't really get your point. How does any of what you say make the "people running this seem completely clueless"?" Because they don't seem to understand the industry today. As they say "performers should be banging the door down to get a piece of the action" and they expect young people to jump at the chance. When in actual fact it may of been the case 10 years ago but with the advances in technology, young people who are good enough are already able to be noticed. Young people good enough to enter this would of once used competitions and things like this to potentially get signed to a label. Before the digital age it would of been costly to have music mass produced and pressed to tape, cd or vinyl. Now though people who are good enough can just release things as a digital download which costs now money. Underground music becoming more commercial also plays a part. Years ago it would of been 90% bands and live performers. Now though a lot of young people are getting into dubstep and drum and bass, which is synthesised music. So instead of being able to perform it, it's made in bedroom studios through sequencing software. petet25
  • Score: -2

4:02pm Fri 10 Jan 14

ArmadilloSackRace says...

petet25 wrote:
"I don't really get your point. How does any of what you say make the "people running this seem completely clueless"?"

Because they don't seem to understand the industry today. As they say "performers should be banging the door down to get a piece of the action" and they expect young people to jump at the chance. When in actual fact it may of been the case 10 years ago but with the advances in technology, young people who are good enough are already able to be noticed.

Young people good enough to enter this would of once used competitions and things like this to potentially get signed to a label. Before the digital age it would of been costly to have music mass produced and pressed to tape, cd or vinyl. Now though people who are good enough can just release things as a digital download which costs now money.

Underground music becoming more commercial also plays a part. Years ago it would of been 90% bands and live performers. Now though a lot of young people are getting into dubstep and drum and bass, which is synthesised music. So instead of being able to perform it, it's made in bedroom studios through sequencing software.
What does any of this have to do with having the opportunity to play in front of a large crowd at a well known arena?
[quote][p][bold]petet25[/bold] wrote: "I don't really get your point. How does any of what you say make the "people running this seem completely clueless"?" Because they don't seem to understand the industry today. As they say "performers should be banging the door down to get a piece of the action" and they expect young people to jump at the chance. When in actual fact it may of been the case 10 years ago but with the advances in technology, young people who are good enough are already able to be noticed. Young people good enough to enter this would of once used competitions and things like this to potentially get signed to a label. Before the digital age it would of been costly to have music mass produced and pressed to tape, cd or vinyl. Now though people who are good enough can just release things as a digital download which costs now money. Underground music becoming more commercial also plays a part. Years ago it would of been 90% bands and live performers. Now though a lot of young people are getting into dubstep and drum and bass, which is synthesised music. So instead of being able to perform it, it's made in bedroom studios through sequencing software.[/p][/quote]What does any of this have to do with having the opportunity to play in front of a large crowd at a well known arena? ArmadilloSackRace
  • Score: 4

4:25pm Mon 13 Jan 14

petet25 says...

"What does any of this have to do with having the opportunity to play in front of a large crowd at a well known arena?"

I have already explained why.

I am merely making the point that through technology, competitions like this are outdated.

As I put, a lot of the more popular music nowadays includes dubstep and drum and bass. Music like that was once classed as "underground" meaning it had a low fanbase.

Now it's commercial, a lot of young people are getting into that that music instead of music performed by bands.

How are they meant to perform dubstep or drum and bass on stage in front of many people? It is not created by physical musical instruments. It is made on a computer using sequencing software, virtual instruments and maybe some hardware synths. There is no performance to give.

That on its own will reduce the potential amount of young people who would enter. I'm not going to go over the other points I have already mentioned.

Fact's speak for themselves however. Why is it that more young people are getting into making music than ever, but nobody really wants to enter this competition?
"What does any of this have to do with having the opportunity to play in front of a large crowd at a well known arena?" I have already explained why. I am merely making the point that through technology, competitions like this are outdated. As I put, a lot of the more popular music nowadays includes dubstep and drum and bass. Music like that was once classed as "underground" meaning it had a low fanbase. Now it's commercial, a lot of young people are getting into that that music instead of music performed by bands. How are they meant to perform dubstep or drum and bass on stage in front of many people? It is not created by physical musical instruments. It is made on a computer using sequencing software, virtual instruments and maybe some hardware synths. There is no performance to give. That on its own will reduce the potential amount of young people who would enter. I'm not going to go over the other points I have already mentioned. Fact's speak for themselves however. Why is it that more young people are getting into making music than ever, but nobody really wants to enter this competition? petet25
  • Score: -2

8:49am Thu 16 Jan 14

ArmadilloSackRace says...

petet25 wrote:
"What does any of this have to do with having the opportunity to play in front of a large crowd at a well known arena?"

I have already explained why.

I am merely making the point that through technology, competitions like this are outdated.

As I put, a lot of the more popular music nowadays includes dubstep and drum and bass. Music like that was once classed as "underground" meaning it had a low fanbase.

Now it's commercial, a lot of young people are getting into that that music instead of music performed by bands.

How are they meant to perform dubstep or drum and bass on stage in front of many people? It is not created by physical musical instruments. It is made on a computer using sequencing software, virtual instruments and maybe some hardware synths. There is no performance to give.

That on its own will reduce the potential amount of young people who would enter. I'm not going to go over the other points I have already mentioned.

Fact's speak for themselves however. Why is it that more young people are getting into making music than ever, but nobody really wants to enter this competition?
"As I put, a lot of the more popular music nowadays includes dubstep and drum and bass. Music like that was once classed as "underground" meaning it had a low fanbase.

Now it's commercial, a lot of young people are getting into that that music instead of music performed by bands."

Yeah, every kid who likes music is in to dubstep and drum & bass. That's quite a sweeping generalisation that I would argue is way off the mark. It pretty much renders the rest of you say redundant.

There are questions to be asked as to why people haven't entered this competition, but I doubt they're the ones that you're asking.
[quote][p][bold]petet25[/bold] wrote: "What does any of this have to do with having the opportunity to play in front of a large crowd at a well known arena?" I have already explained why. I am merely making the point that through technology, competitions like this are outdated. As I put, a lot of the more popular music nowadays includes dubstep and drum and bass. Music like that was once classed as "underground" meaning it had a low fanbase. Now it's commercial, a lot of young people are getting into that that music instead of music performed by bands. How are they meant to perform dubstep or drum and bass on stage in front of many people? It is not created by physical musical instruments. It is made on a computer using sequencing software, virtual instruments and maybe some hardware synths. There is no performance to give. That on its own will reduce the potential amount of young people who would enter. I'm not going to go over the other points I have already mentioned. Fact's speak for themselves however. Why is it that more young people are getting into making music than ever, but nobody really wants to enter this competition?[/p][/quote]"As I put, a lot of the more popular music nowadays includes dubstep and drum and bass. Music like that was once classed as "underground" meaning it had a low fanbase. Now it's commercial, a lot of young people are getting into that that music instead of music performed by bands." Yeah, every kid who likes music is in to dubstep and drum & bass. That's quite a sweeping generalisation that I would argue is way off the mark. It pretty much renders the rest of you say redundant. There are questions to be asked as to why people haven't entered this competition, but I doubt they're the ones that you're asking. ArmadilloSackRace
  • Score: 0

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